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Finding Seaglass: Poems from the Drift

  • Scottish Poetry library Crichton's Close Edinburgh, Scotland, EH8 United Kingdom (map)

Finding Sea Glass, poems from Lavery’s spoken word show The Drift, is a journey through history, Scottishness, belonging, and through grief. Lavery uses poetry to explore the legacy of being mixed race in Scotland left to her by her father. Hers is a poetry of love, loss and bereavement, as well as a searingly honest portrayal of growing up mixed race in Scotland.

The pamphlet will be published by the acclaimed Edinburgh based independent publisher Stewed Rhubarb Press. Lavery will then take the accompanying show, The Drift, on tour with the National Theatre of Scotland as part of the 2019 season in October 2019.

This event will be supported with poetry from Jim Monaghan, Colin Bramwell and Melissa Goodbourn, and music from Hailey Beavis.

 

Hannah Lavery was the Scottish Book Trust Reader in Residence for East Lothian in 2015. She was awarded a Tom McGrath Playwriting Grant in 2015, a Megaphone Residency from The Workers’ Theatre in 2017 and a Summerhall Lab in 2019. She was also shortlisted for the Bridgeport Prize (poetry) in 2017. Her poetry has been published by Gutter Magazine, 404 ink amongst others, and her first pamphlet of short fiction, Rocket Girls, was published by Postbox Press in 2018. She  has had commissions from Royal Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh University and Greater Glasgow NHS. Her most recent spoken word show, The Drift was part of National Theatre of Scotland’s Just Start Here festival in January 2018, previewing at the Tron theatre with the National Theatre of Scotland as part of Black History Month in October 2018, and will go on a Scotland wide tour as part of National Theatre of Scotland’s Season 2019.

 

“Hannah Lavery’s wonderful performance-poetry monologue The Drift… asks the most challenging questions of the western world – and in this case of Scotland – about our real views on race and belonging.” – Joyce McMillan (The Scotsman)

“An incredibly moving piece, a mix of delicately crafted words and raw humanity. It doesn’t shy away from the truth, but the best art never does.” – Kevin Gilday (Sonnet Youth)